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Harper’s Ferry National Historic Site is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah river where the states of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia meet.

 

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The park includes the town of Harper’s Ferry notable as a center of 19th-century industry and as the scene of John Brown’s abolitionist uprising, as well as it’s role in the American Civil War.

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Abolitionist John Brown led an armed group in the capture of the armory in 1859. Brown had hoped he would be able to arm the slaves and lead them against U.S. forces in a rebellion to overthrow slavery. After his capture in the armory by a group of Marines (led by U.S. Army Col. Robert E. Lee), Brown was hanged, predicting in his last words that civil war was looming on the horizon, a prediction that came true less than two years later. The most important building remaining from John Brown’s raid is the firehouse, now called John Brown’s Fort where he resisted the Marines.

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The American Civil War (1861–1865) found Harpers Ferry right on the boundary between the Union and Confederate forces. The strategic position along this border and the valuable manufacturing base was a coveted strategic goal for both sides, but particularly the South due to its lack of manufacturing centers. Consequently, the town exchanged hands no less than eight times during the course of the war. Union forces abandoned the town immediately after the state of Virginia seceded from the Union, burning the armory and seizing 15,000 rifles. Colonel Thomas J. Jackson, who would later become known as “Stonewall”, secured the region for the Confederates a week later and shipped most of the manufacturing implements south.   Jackson spent the next two months preparing his troops and building fortifications, but was ordered to withdraw south and east to assist P.G.T. Beauregard at the First Battle of Bull Run. Union troops returned in force, occupying the town and began to rebuild parts of the armory. Stonewall Jackson, now a major general, returned in September 1862 under orders from Robert E. Lee to retake the arsenal and then to join Lee’s army north in Maryland. Jackson’s assault on the Federal forces there, during the Battle of Harper’s Ferry led to the capitulation of 12,500 Union troops, which was the largest number of Union prisoners taken at one time during the war. The town exchanged hands several more times over the next two years.

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